Download Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (Yale by Susanna Braund, Glenn W. Most PDF

Download Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (Yale by Susanna Braund, Glenn W. Most PDF

By Susanna Braund, Glenn W. Most

Anger is located all over the historical global, from the first actual notice of the Iliad via all literary genres and each element of private and non-private lifestyles. but, it is just very lately that classicists, historians, and philosophers have started to check anger in antiquity. This quantity contains major new experiences via authors from diversified disciplines and nations at the literary, philosophical, scientific, and political elements of historical anger.

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There is a (later) first-person use of the verb m¯eniein at Eur. Hipp. 146, and the use of the participle of apom¯eniein in the genitive absolute at Il. 62 is equivalent to a first-person use of the verb. Muellner’s attempt to account for the difficulties in Watkins’ view (1996: 189–94) fails to convince me. 95 Frisk (1946) 31–3, 35–6, 38–9. So Frisk (1946) 29. Hdt. 7 (m¯eniein: Frisk [1946] 35); other, later (incl. New Testament) examples in Frisk (1946) 33–4, 35–6. Ethics, ethology, terminology 33 That m¯enis has this particular character which associates it with the prodigious and awesome wrath of gods, heroes, and the dead does not warrant Muellner’s insistence that it is “a sanction meant to guarantee and maintain the integrity of the world-order” (1996: 26; cf.

295–304. Cf. Il. 486 (enemy boasts over slain comrade). 65–8: Achilles refers to the end of his anger at Agamemnon as “ceasing his cholos” and subduing his thumos, though his achos persists, for it is not right, he observes, to persist in meneainein; cf. 23). See Redfield (1975) 171–2; R. v. m”nov; Clarke (1999) 111 (which seems to me slightly at odds with his p. 94, n. 85). On the warrior’s menos cf. Hershkowitz (1998a) 142–7. K¨ovecses (2000: 61–86) demonstrates that the image schema of emotion as a force is basic to the concept; on the more specific metaphors here, see Lakoff and K¨ovecses (1987) 202–3 (anger as fire); K¨ovecses (2000) 38, 64, 75–7 (emotion as fire); 37, 64, 71–2 (emotion as natural force); 21, 170 (anger as fire); 21, 167, 171 (anger as natural force).

So W. v. mhn©w. 282? There is a (later) first-person use of the verb m¯eniein at Eur. Hipp. 146, and the use of the participle of apom¯eniein in the genitive absolute at Il. 62 is equivalent to a first-person use of the verb. Muellner’s attempt to account for the difficulties in Watkins’ view (1996: 189–94) fails to convince me. 95 Frisk (1946) 31–3, 35–6, 38–9. So Frisk (1946) 29. Hdt. 7 (m¯eniein: Frisk [1946] 35); other, later (incl. New Testament) examples in Frisk (1946) 33–4, 35–6. Ethics, ethology, terminology 33 That m¯enis has this particular character which associates it with the prodigious and awesome wrath of gods, heroes, and the dead does not warrant Muellner’s insistence that it is “a sanction meant to guarantee and maintain the integrity of the world-order” (1996: 26; cf.

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