Download The Exagoge of Ezekiel by Howard Jacobson PDF

Download The Exagoge of Ezekiel by Howard Jacobson PDF

By Howard Jacobson

The Exagoge is a drama at the subject matter of the Jewish Exodus, written in Greek within the kind of a Greek tragedy through a Jew residing in Alexandria most likely at your time throughout the moment century BC. It survives in 269 traces - no longer remoted verses yet forming a number of non-stop passages - adequate to offer the form of the play and to bare Ezekiel as a tragedian of importance. For the coed of Jewish literary historical past and concept Ezekiel is a most vital resource, of curiosity for being one of many earliest examples of Jewish exegesis and paraphrase of the Bible. Professor Jacobson accompanies the textual content of the play with a translation. within the statement he examines the fragments line via line, evaluating them with the biblical account and different bills in similar Jewish resources. The vast and readable advent examines the ancient, social and highbrow heritage to Ezekiel and the Exagoge.

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Both types can readily be tied to the Biblical Hebrew phenomena of (1) the absence of a copula and conĀ­ sequently the common occurrence of verbless sentences; (2) the apparent use of the participle as a finite v e r b . Examples of the first may be seen in the Exagoge at 209, 2 6 1 , 198f, possibly 2 4 9 . Examples of the second may be present at 169 (depending on one's reading and understanding of the text), 180-2 (depending on how one takes the sentence), and possibly 198f (though see above).

G. 3 1 , 32, 34. 4. F u t u r e for imperative ( 1 5 2 , 1 6 0 , 1 7 1 , 188). 5. Frequent use of comparative cb? ( 8 1 , 2 3 3 , 234, 247, 2 6 3 , 268). 6. Pleonastic &pxeo&UL + infinitive (possibly at 220f). 7. Sentences in which no finite verb is found. These fall into two broad categories: (a) sentences in which n o verb form at all is p r e s e n t ; (b) sentences in which it appears that the participle is doing the work of a finite verb. Both types can readily be tied to the Biblical Hebrew phenomena of (1) the absence of a copula and conĀ­ sequently the common occurrence of verbless sentences; (2) the apparent use of the participle as a finite v e r b .

This seems to m e the only reasonable way to make sense of t h e manuscript reading of verses 1-6 (with reference t o /cat in line 3). 255. It is, however, more than likely that we should accept Dtibner's emendation of Hanoi) pevov t o KOKovpe&a. The simple truth is that should we be so inclined we could find some parallel in a non-Jewish (non-Christian) Greek text for each of these phenomena. But would there be any point in so doing? Would 22 44 Introduction it really tell us anything? After all, what can be surprising in the fact t h a t a Jewish author who was steeped in the Septuagint should have been to some degree influenced in his own writing style - especially when writing a Biblical drama based on t h e Septuagint - by the peculiarities of the Greek of that work?

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